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I’ve officially run out of Lomography Tungsten 64 film, having used my last roll during my trip to Caramoan, Camarines Sur a few weeks ago. Love the pink hue it produced whenever used under sunlight, such as in the shot above. Also love the deep green negatives they produced.

I’ll be posting the rest of the shots from the roll on the Travelomo Facebook page soon. For now, a simple question: Where can I get more?

 

 

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Tempus fugit, or so the Romans used to say. I’ve neglected this blog for far too long (and wasted a year’s worth of domain name charges!), and I must make amends. 

I’ve been busy, far too busy than any well-adjusted person has any right to be. The professional publishing world (where I live in) does not stop on weekends, holidays and sick leaves, so I’ve had little time to pursue my, eherm, hobby. Things have started lightening up recently, thank goodness, with some new members in my editorial team to delegate to, and better processes in place. More time to shoot, fabulous!

I’ll try to keep my posts short, to give me no excuse not to update this site. Tonight I leave you with this, a photo of my wife, shot in Virac, Catanduanes, on Fujifilm Provia 120 film on a circa 1930s-1940s Zeiss Ikon Ikonta B 521/16 medium format folder. 

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I recently received a shipment of expired slide film from a seller in the States, and among the rolls of old Sensia and Provia I found several rolls of Photo Porst ChromeX100. I’d never yet shot with this film stock before, though I’d read many good things about it from local users. I was eager to try it out.

Loading a roll into an Olympus XA3, I took the film for a spin in and around Manila, Lemery and Taal. Below are some of the results.

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Sky over Taal

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Sidewalk Nap

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Ex-house

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Leggy Wife

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School Zone

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Intramuros Skate Park

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Inside Orale!

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Mother and Child

 Not bad for film that expired in 2003, no?

When you analyze the photos in Photoshop, you’ll see that the age of the film has caused it to lose image data from the low end of the red channel and high end of blue, resulting in the distinct color tint  you see in the photos. There’s almost a Mello Yello-Mountain Dew quality to the shots.

I tried to find out more about the film but didn’t learn much more. It was sold and distributed by Photo Porst, Germany’s largest camera retailer at one point but is sure to be a rebadged film stock from Japan. Some folks say it’s Fuji Sensia under all that Deutsche-ness. I can’t tell. What I can tell is that I have only two rolls left.

Gotta make those count.

For the full set of photos, go to the Travelomo Facebook page.

I’d been putting off shooting with slide film and having the rolls cross-processed, mainly because slide film is both a) expensive, and b) hard to find, but I was able to score a couple of cheap expired Ektachromes from an online retailer so I ran out of excuses.

For those who aren’t familiar with it, cross-processing (aka XPRO) is a developing technique where the developing agent used for slide film and the developing agent used for negative film are swapped: the most popular being slide film getting processed in C41 instead of E6.* This typically results in photos with deeper color saturation and an off-kilter color balance, depending on the type of film and chemical used, of course.

Here are a few shots I took in Nasugbu, Batangas a few weeks ago.

Marketplace Chess Match

Tricyclola

Sidewalk Shoe Doctor

Jowa before Jesus

Church Child

All shots were taken with a Yashica Electro, I don’t remember if it was the Electro GL or the Electro GS. I’m thinking the GL because I’m not seeing the light leaks that my GS gets.

I must say, I never thought I’d enjoy seeing an unnatural blue cast to my shots, but these are pleasant. Will explore slide film and XPRO further.

*There are other combinations in cross processing, as Wikipedia will tell you.

This just in from Lomography dot com. They’ve recently released two new film stocks, the Lomography X Tungsten 35mm and Earl Grey Black & White 120.  Here’s their marketing schtick:

Lomography X Tungsten

Tungsten Tones And X-Pro Powers 35mm/64 ISO

Lomography X Tungsten is a 35mm, 64 ISO color-slide film guaranteed to shock you into excitement with its electrifying personality! Used under the right light conditions, it will wash your photos in blue hues and tones. And things get extra exhilarating when you take X Tungsten over to the parallel universe of cross processing; get ready to experience beautifully vivid colors with that distinct tungsten appeal!

Earl Grey Black & White 120

The Monochrome Earl Is Now Available
in Medium Format! 120/100 ISO

Recently we launched Lomography Earl Grey 35mm and now the Earl has ascended to 120 format too! Lomography Earl Grey 120 is a stunning 100 ISO black and white film, perfect for all your Medium Format Cameras – You’ll get super smooth shots with amazing black, white and grey tones; get yours today!

Now, I already have my favorite B&W film stock, so Earl Grey doesn’t really interest me. I’ll stick to my tried and tested, thank you very much. Lomography X Tungsten. however, is a different case.

Normally I’m not one to mindlessly drink Lomography’s Kool Aid, but X Tungsten is…intriguing. It’s balanced for tungsten light, meaning, the film eliminates the color cast produced by tungsten light upon a subject or scene, say in an indoor shot. If you shoot tungsten-balanced film under different lighting conditions, the colors in your photos take on different qualities.  Shoot tungsten-balanced film outdoors and you’ll get a blue cast in your shadows, for instance. Cross process that and the blues get even deeper.

Now the really intriguing bit for me is the new film’s pricing, US$25.38 per pack of three. Compare that with Fujifilm Fujichrome 64T ISO64 Tungsten-balanced film, priced at US$11.59 per roll, and you’ll see that Lomography’s film comes out cheaper. For a company that is known for its ridiculously overpriced films, that  is a big surprise.

So what’s the catch? Is LXT expired? Is it from some dubious supplier in China? Is there even a catch?

What I definitely would like to know is what film stock is under all of Lomography’s branding. Unlike The Impossible Project, Lomography doesn’t make their own film, so this is for sure a rebadge. If I can identify what the film stock is, then I can get it even cheaper hehe.

I’m not sure when this will hit Team Manila stores here in the Philippines or how much these will cost per box, but hopefully they don’t deviate much from Lomography’s online price. Methinks I’ma gonna try ’em out.

On my recent trip to Hong Kong, I was faced with a difficult purchasing choice: to get a Superheadz Demekin (see previous entry) or a Superheadz Golden Half.  The Golden Half is an interesting little thing, so named because it shoots 35mm film but at half frame, meaning for a 36 shot roll you get 72. It’s got two aperture settings, f/8 and f/11 as well as a hotshoe for fun strobist action.  While I may have bought the Demekin, the Golden Half remains on my must-have camera list. 

 This means that my favorite pop culture girl has one up on me.  Genie Ranada is no stranger to gadgets. She is the lifestyle editor for the tech magazine T3 and is one of the few people I know who’ve been featured on Boingboing.net (no I am not saying why or what for).  She has BOTH a Demekin and a Golden Half. She takes great pictures, to boot! Here are some of her Golden Half shots, all taken during the Dec 08 holidays in Laoag, Ilocos Norte in the Philippines. Fuji Provia 100F slide film was used and cross-processed. Enjoy!

 

angelchurch

angelchurch

 

bluebeetle

bluebeetle

 

cemeteryblues

cemeteryblues

 

cloud9

cloud9

 

cross+cherubs

cross+cherubs

 

texicano

texicano

 

If you want to see more of Genie’s Golden Half photographs, do visit her multiply site

 

Oh, and this is what the Superheadz Golden Half looks like. If you want one of your own, Oh Shoot! sells them, too. 

Superheadz Golden Half
Superheadz Golden Half