Among the cameras I brought to Beijing was a Nishika N9000, one of two 3D lenticular toy cameras I currently own. For the most part, the Nishika stayed in the hotel room as I opted to take only two cameras (out of five) at a time during our daily forays, and I had a hard time giving up my Oly rangefinder and PEN S. For our trip up the Great Wallof China, however, the Nishika was a definite must.

Like the Nishika N8000, the N9000 takes four half frame photographs simultaneously. You can take those frames and  process them in Photoshop and Stereophotomaker to produce 3D photos, either anaglyph or stereo pair. I managed to find time today in the middle of my workday to process a couple. It took me a while because I haven’t done this in so long, I kind of forgot my workflow. For shame.

Anyway, here’s a couple of shots in both anaglyph and stereo pair. I’ll add more as I process them.  Still have several rolls of film to go through, so expect a few more chapters from this Beijing trip.

Here’s some shots that are a bit overdue for posting, taken last April in New York City with my Nishika N9000 3D lenticular camera.

I like that, with 3D anaglyphs, I can float my Travelomo.com text within the photo’s depths. I’m also loving Kodak’s BW400CN film, though I’ve been told by the local Kodak rep that this has been phased out recently. I only know of one store that still has stocks – pricey, but methinks I shall buy whatever’s on their shelf. Good thing Ilford has a substitute in its XP2 Super.

Last week a reader dropped me an email asking how I create “wiggle 3D” animations from my lenticular camera photos. He’d recently bought a Nishika N8000 package complete with flash, case and Vincent Price video and was eager to try his hand at it. Here, then, for all you Nishika users out there, is my workflow.

Step One: Create Individual Frames

The Nishika N8000 produces four frames simultaneously, each one slightly different from the others due to how its four lenses are angled. I usually get my scans back from the developer like this:

After post-processing (which I won’t go into), select and copy each of the four frames and save them as separate images. Just save them as jpg as these will be for Web use. Organize them into proper folders so you don’t clutter up your directories.


Step Two: Stack Frames

From the FILE menu, select SCRIPTS, then LOAD FILES INTO STACK. This opens your four frames as layers in a single image file. Make sure not to select “Attempt to Automatically Align Source Images.” We’ll be doing that manually in the next step.


Step Three: Align Images

Once the image opens, make sure your stacked layers are in the proper order. Select an anchor point from which to align each layer. I usually choose the subject’s eye or face. Play with the Opacity of each layer to make sure your alignment is correct.


Step Four: Crop Your Image

During the alignment process, you will invariably create gaps at the edges of your image. Make sure to crop your image accordingly.


Step Five: Animate Your Layers

Once your layers are aligned, open up the animation panel from your WINDOW menu. Click on the small pull down menu on the upper right of the animation panel and select “Make Frames from Layers.” This will create a four-frame animation 1-2-3-4. For smoother looping, copy frames 2 and 3 and paste into your timeline in this order: 1-2-3-4-3-2.


Step Six: Save for Web

From the FILE menu, select “Save for Web & Devices,” which allows you to save your image as an animated GIF. You may adjust the size and quality of your image before saving if you wish.

Here’s the finished product.

Rally in 3D @ Nishika N8000

Aquino Funeral Cortege Stereo Pair

I promised some of my readers that I’d post a 3D shot of the Aquino funeral cortege minus the epilepsy-inducing animation. So, I’ve prepared two versions of my favorite shot. The first (above this paragraph) is a stereo pair, which you can view using the cross-eyed technique or, if you print it out, with a stereo pair viewer. The second is a red-cyan anaglyph which you can view in 3D if you wear them funky 3D glasses.

Aquino Funeral Cortege Anaglyph

I actually prefer these two methods of rendering 2D photos into 3D over my sleight-of-eye animated shots. Using the proper gear or technique, your brain actually sees the image in stereo, just like you’d see in real life (if you have the use of both your eyes, that is).

Ever since Long Way Round, I’ve been a Charley Boorman fanboy, following his travel and adventure exploits in Race to Dakar, Long Way Down and By Any Means. A few weeks ago I was able to meet him in person at a UNICEF press conference during the Philippine leg of season two of By Any Means.

I couldn’t very well let the opportunity to photograph him just slip away, so I brought some cameras, including the Nishika N8000, to shoot him with.  He is literally the first subject I used the Nishika on and I am happy with the results.

Charley Boorman in the Philippines

Charley Boorman in the Philippines @ Nishika N8000

Charley Boorman in the Philippines @ Nishika N8000

Charley Boorman in the Philippines @ Nishika N8000

Charley Boorman in the Philippines @ Nishika N8000

Charley Boorman in the Philippines @ Nishika N8000

Charley Boorman in the Philippines @ Nishika N8000

A triptych from my digital:

Triptych

Triptych @Canon EOS 350D

And the requisite fanboy shot…

Fanboy

Fanboy

In the week or so since I posted an entry about my new old camera, the Nishika N8000 3D lenticular camera, I’ve been scouring the web, looking for whatever material I can find about this strange piece of kit. I struck paydirt on Youtube.

The celebrity endorser for the Nishika N8000 was none other than Vincent Price, horror icon and star of many a 3D horror flick (He was also the narrator in Michael Jackson’s Thriller, MJ RIP). Here is perhaps one of the strangest photography video instructionals ever to be released. Enjoy.

By the way, tomorrow I am having my test rolls processed. Crossing my fingers.

L-R: Bong Salaveria, Mrs Travelomo and Mr Travelomo

L-R: Bong Salaveria, Mrs Travelomo and Mr Travelomo

After five great years of helping revive the art, music and culture scene in the urban enclave of Cubao, my favorite antique-retro-curio store Vintage Pop closed shop permanently last night. The owner, Bong Salaveria, is moving to Canada with his family in a few months and setting up shop there. Vintage Pop closed not with a whimper, as many shops do, but with a bang, going out in a party flowing with beer and nachos, full of friends and well-wishers. Most of the store’s stock of clocks, tin robots, old cameras and record players had been packed away, for shipping to Vancouver. Only their ghosts remained, on the walls outlined in colored chalk and permanent marker.

Still, there were a lot of odds and ends for sale piled up in bins and on the floor, and one of those odd bits was a Nishika N8000 lenticular camera. The latch to the door was broken and black electrical tape was used to keep the door shut, but otherwise it looked like it would work. A quick test revealed that the mechanicals still worked. Bong saw me fiddling with it and came over. “You know, Karlo, I have no more use for that. Keep it. It’s yours. ”

I gladly accepted, promising Bong I’d send him a 3D photo if I got the camera to work. Which is a promise I intend to keep.

Here’s a few shots of this strange oversized camera. More info in the days to come.

Nishika N8000 Lenticular Camera

Nishika N8000 Lenticular Camera

Nishika N8000 Lenticular Camera

Nishika N8000 Lenticular Camera

Nishika N8000 Lenticular Camera

Nishika N8000 Lenticular Camera

Nishika N8000 Lenticular Camera

Nishika N8000 Lenticular Camera

Nishika N8000 Lenticular Camera

Nishika N8000 Lenticular Camera